Take Your Inner-Child on the Ultimate Slide

Artist Carsten Höller is the main designer behind London’s newest attraction which will appeal to kids of all ages and thrill seekers alike.

Höller — developing on an initial proposal by Bblur Architecture — has designed the 178 m-long (584 ft) helter skelter, set to open on 24 June. The slide is the latest intervention to the 115 meter-tall (377 ft) Orbit, conceived by Anish Kapoor for the 2012 Olympics, following an abseiling attraction completed last year.

One of the most striking and enduring visual legacies of the Olympic and Paralympic Games that united London in 2012 the ArcelorMittal Orbit was designed by sculptor Sir Anish Kapoor and engineer Cecil Balmond. Its extraordinary looping structure has become a byword for design innovation and playful invention.

Made of 35,000 bolts and enough steel to make 265 double-decker buses, the ArcelorMittal Orbit offers extraordinary 20-mile views over Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and the London skyline. Steel was partly chosen as a building material for its infinite recyclability – 60% of the ArcelorMittal Orbit is made from recycled steel, including washing machines and used cars.
The ArcelorMittal Orbit stands tall as Britain’s largest sculpture, part of the Olympic legacy that transformed East London, and a landmark in its own right, transfixing and delighting visitors with its offer of a unique view of a city.

The Orbit Tower slide will be made up of 30 sections — 12 of which are now complete — and feature 12 turns, including a tight corkscrew twist. It starts at a height of 74 meters and has a top speed of 15 miles per hour, taking 40 seconds to go down. Tickets for the attraction cost £15 ($22) and include access to the Orbit’s viewing platform.

This helter skelter slide is likely to become a must-see attraction for international adrenaline junkies and oddity seekers. London isn’t the only city expecting a helter skelter either, with plans afoot for a glass slide 1,000 ft up Downtown LA’s US Bank Tower.