Let’s Go There!


While it may be difficult to imagine a desert oasis, they do actually exist and believe it or not in Egypt they are often far from the top tourist destinations.

However, just about two hours south west of Cairo lives the Fayoum Oasis which is arguably a hidden gem of the country. It is made up of lakes and canals. The large region is a great weekend or day spot as it is far slower paced than Cairo.

Many can’t imagine green farms, art and poetry, relaxation and meditation when they think of Egypt—but this is what Fayoum Oasis provides.

The area also includes a protected national park, Wadi El Rayan, that encompasses almost 700 square miles of land. It includes an upper and lower man-made lake separated by one Egypt’s largest waterfalls. The park also includes dunes, natural sulfur springs and mountains.

Visitors can also tour the strange and beautiful Wadi Al Hitan open air museum which includes a surreal depiction of the evolution of life. Wadi Al Hitan as been a UNESCO World Heritage site since 2005.

For the more adventurous you can visit the Magic Lake which changes color according to the time of day but is only accessible by ATV.

Fayoum Oasis is a must visit for those looking to deepen their Egyptian experience.

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All the right elements for a classic, European winter vacation—winter sports, sustainable practices, and Danish coziness—came together to create a fascinating new travel destination which opened to the public in early October.

Amager Bakke, or CopenHill, is the name of the new destination. Though you might be surprised to learn it is a heat and waste-to-energy power plant in Copenhagen. But it is also a man-made ski and snowboard slope.

The building itself burns waste instead of fossil fuels and is part of Copenhagen’s initiative to be the first carbon-neutral capital by 2025. The plant works by burning waste and then using the heat for, well, heat–and also uses some of that energy to create electricity. These two resources support tens of thousands of homes in Copenhagen.

As for the ski area, it is 400 meters long and includes four slopes of varied skill level. There is also a freestyle park and slalom course. The slopes do not rely on either natural or man-made snow, thus promoting green tourism all year in Denmark.

The park also includes running trails, climbing walls, and a café.

Denmark winters are cold, but there are no mountains, so this facility adds some diversity to what the country has to offer tourists.

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Why Iceland in August?


Posted By on Aug 19, 2018

Visiting Iceland in August offers mind boggling untamed chances (puffins relocation and whale viewing are at their pinnacle), a bunch of celebrations and social occasions, and totally lovely climate. August denotes the finish of the mid year, and in this way is a standout amongst the most calm a very long time to movement to Iceland with wonderful temperatures, little precipitation, and chances to encounter both the Midnight Sun and the Northern Lights.

Top 10 Things to Do in Iceland in August

Charming individuals from all around the globe, Iceland has such a great amount to offer. From natural life seeing chances to social celebrations there is never a deficiency of exercises. Find the Top 10 exercises you ought to do in Iceland in August,

Celebrations consistently

Puffin Migration

Beginning of the Northern Lights

Brilliant Circle Visit

Ring Road Tour

Blue Lagoon and Hot Springs

Midnight Sun

Cascade and Glacier climbs

Whale Watching

Town visits (streets are clear of ice)

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While there are many styles of vacations you can take your family on, many still favor the tried and true family road trip to destinations important to the history and culture of our country.

Boston, Massachusetts

While many coastal cities, east and west, are significant to the birth and growth of America, Boston stands out as particularly significant to the early struggles of our great nation. Beacon Hill in Boston was home to the descendants of early English colonialists whose elegant, gas-lit streets are well worth wandering through. And of course no trip to Boston would be complete without a visit to the famous Boston Harbor which includes a fantastic interactive museum and two replica 18th century vessels. Boston is also home to America’s first college, Harvard, which was established in 1636, student lead walking tours are available.

New York City, New York

While the Big Apple has so much to offer one couldn’t possibly see it all in one trip, the historically minded will want to visit some particular locations: Ellis Island, landing spot of some 12 million immigrants is as fascinating as any place you might visit in the city and features a stunning museum; the Brooklyn Bridge is a must see landmark—it took 600 some workers 14 years to construct one of the world’s first steel wire suspension bridges which was the longest of its kind at completion in 1883; architectural buffs won’t want to miss Brooklyn Heights, one of the first areas of the city to be deemed a historic district.

San Antonio, Texas

While the Alamo is certainly a main point of interest, the entire city is a treasure trove of Spanish colonialism. The Alamo itself is one of only five missions that have been named a UNESCO World Heritage Site (i.e., don’t miss!). The new River Walk Mission Reach Trail will allow you to explore the grounds and buildings in which priests and Native Americans worked and lived together.

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While many in the United States might be sick of the cold, some of the coldest regions in the world have their own awe-inspiring natural beauty to warm the heart and soul. For anyone planning a cold weather adventure, you may consider one of these prime viewing locations, because while there are many places where one can see the Northern Lights, they are best viewed in particular parts of the world.

CNN Travel writer Maggie Wong compiles the 11 top viewing spots in her recent article: Jokulsarlon, Iceland; Fairbanks, Alaska, United States; Paatsjoki, Finnish Lapland; Unstad, Lofoten, Norway; Cairngorms National Park, Scotland; Kangerlussuaq, Greenland; Yellowknife, Canada; Tromsø, Norway; Abisko, Sweden; Muonio, Finnish Lapland; Southern Hemisphere, End of a Contentment.

The Northern Lights are a natural phenomenon that many people are familiar with, but not everyone understands. Better known as “the Northern Lights” the natural event is referred to by scientists as an aurora. Wikipedia describes an aurora:

“Auroras are produced when the magnetosphere is sufficiently disturbed by the solar wind that the trajectories of charged particles in both solar wind and magnetospheric plasma, mainly in the form of electrons and protons, precipitate them into the upper atmosphere (thermosphere/exosphere), where their energy is lost. The resulting ionization and excitation of atmospheric constituents emits light of varying colour and complexity. The form of the aurora, occurring within bands around both polar regions, is also dependent on the amount of acceleration imparted to the precipitating particles. Precipitating protons generally produce optical emissions as incident hydrogen atoms after gaining electrons from the atmosphere. Proton auroras are usually observed at lower latitudes.”

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CNN Travel reported on the Europe’s first underwater museum Wednesday. Two years in the making, the museum is located in the deep waters off the shores of Spanish island Lanzarote. It is only accessible to snorkelers, divers and, of course, sea creatures.

The museum, named Museo Altlantico, features the sculptures of artist Jason deCaires Taylor. The 300 sculptures are submerged at depths between 12 and 15 meters on the sea floor of Coloradas Bay.

These sculptures will be more than just art, however. These sculptures are made from environmentally friendly concrete and are part of an artificial reef, which will serve as a breeding site for local aquatic wild life. The sculptures are meant to raise awareness about ocean-related environmental issues by portraying scenes from everyday life.

The Victor Crew

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