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Posted by Victor Crew on

When is the Best Time to Visit Iceland?

Visiting Iceland in August offers mind boggling untamed chances (puffins relocation and whale viewing are at their pinnacle), a bunch of celebrations and social occasions, and totally lovely climate. August denotes the finish of the mid year, and in this way is a standout amongst the most calm a very long time to movement to Iceland with wonderful temperatures, little precipitation, and chances to encounter both the Midnight Sun and the Northern Lights.

Things to Do in Iceland in August

Charming individuals from all around the globe, Iceland has such a great amount to offer. From natural life seeing chances to social celebrations there is never a deficiency of exercises. Find the Top 10 exercises you ought to do in Iceland in August,

Celebrations consistently

Puffin Migration

Beginning of the Northern Lights

Brilliant Circle Visit

Ring Road Tour

Blue Lagoon and Hot Springs

Midnight Sun

Cascade and Glacier climbs

Whale Watching

Town visits (streets are clear of ice)

Posted by Victor Crew on

Man Finds Unique Treasure Hoard in Scotland with Metal Detector

An amateur metal detectorist has unearthed a trove of Bronze Age artifacts in a Scottish field. Experts are calling it “nationally significant” find.

The objects date back to 1,000-900 BC and include a full horse harness and sword. It was all found near Peebles Scotland by Mariusz Stepien while with friends.

After getting strong signals from a bronze object buried about a foot and one-half underground Stepien reported his find.

Archeologists worked on the field for 22 days. They found a sword still in its scabbard, buckles, rings, decorated straps, chariot wheel axle caps among other objects.

Stepien and friends camped out with the archeologists for the whole 22-day dig wanting to see the excavation through.

Stepien’s find is only the second of its kind found in Scotland according to Scotland’s Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service.

The most unique thing was the way the soil preserved the organic material which has never before been seen in Brittan

 

Posted by Victor Crew on

American Cities All Travel Junkies Need to Visit

While there are many styles of vacations you can take your family on, many still favor the tried and true family road trip to destinations important to the history and culture of our country.

While many coastal cities, east and west, are significant to the birth and growth of America, Boston stands out as particularly significant to the early struggles of our great nation. Beacon Hill in Boston was home to the descendants of early English colonialists whose elegant, gas-lit streets are well worth wandering through. And of course no trip to Boston would be complete without a visit to the famous Boston Harbor which includes a fantastic interactive museum and two replica 18th century vessels. Boston is also home to America’s first college, Harvard, which was established in 1636, student lead walking tours are available.

While the Big Apple has so much to offer one couldn’t possibly see it all in one trip, the historically minded will want to visit some particular locations: Ellis Island, landing spot of some 12 million immigrants is as fascinating as any place you might visit in the city and features a stunning museum; the Brooklyn Bridge is a must see landmark—it took 600 some workers 14 years to construct one of the world’s first steel wire suspension bridges which was the longest of its kind at completion in 1883; architectural buffs won’t want to miss Brooklyn Heights, one of the first areas of the city to be deemed a historic district.

While the Alamo is certainly a main point of interest, the entire city is a treasure trove of Spanish colonialism. The Alamo itself is one of only five missions that have been named a UNESCO World Heritage Site (i.e., don’t miss!). The new River Walk Mission Reach Trail will allow you to explore the grounds and buildings in which priests and Native Americans worked and lived together.

Posted by Victor Crew on

Bubble Tea: A Brief History

Bubble tea, the popular Taiwanese drink—if you haven’t at least heard of it perhaps you’ve been vacationing under a rock as it has recently taken the world over. It was created in the 1980’s and is also known as “black pearl tea” and “boba tea” and is now beloved not only in Taiwan and around the world.

While there are no dozens of variations, it is basically a combination of tea, milk and of course the bubbles. These can be anything from large tapioca pearls to balls of fruit jelly.

Bubble tea has risen in the ranks of the food kingdom. It is a new official emoji in 2020. And recently has become a pizza topping and can even be found inside cheesecakes. But perhaps most telling is the fact that it is has been considered a star item of Taiwan state banquets for three years running.

But where did it come from? The story dates back to the 1940s.

In 1949 Chang Fan Shu, a mixologist and bartender who worked in Taiwan under the Japanese in WWII opened a tea shop. This was shou yao shop, the tea all made with cocktail shakers.

This resulted in a cold, clean tasting tea with a foamy top. They called foam tea in Taiwan. And not only was the foamy element new, but the idea of eating and drinking for pleasure was not yet quite part of the culture yet. And cold beverages were a rare treat.

It wasn’t until later on in the 1980’s in Taiwan during their economic boom when tea houses and tea and food restaurants became more popular that modern Bubble Tea was created.

Taiwanese artist and entrepreneur Tu Tsong He decided to open a tea house and ride the trend. While walking in a wet market one day he saw tapioca pearls, a favorite childhood treat of his. He decided to try some in his green tea and took off experimenting.

As these things do, it took off until we have the international phenomenon we have today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Victor Crew on

The Japanese Hanami Tradition

Hanami or “flower viewing” is a traditional Japanese practice in which people enjoy the transient beauty of flowers. Typically, the flowers are sukura or cherry blossoms less popular are the ume or plum blossoms.

As this activity and the related festivals or parties are reliant on nature the few weeks when the flowers are in bloom varies from year to year. The Japanese weather bureau has traditional published a blossom forecast which is watched carefully by those who plan hanami.

In Japan today, hanami are typically outdoor parties that take place under sakura during the day and at night. At night they are called yozakura, this term is typically used by the larger festivals. At these yozakura paper lanterns or lights are strung near and weaved into the blossoms so revelers can view them in the darkness.

Often the sakura parties are crowded and noisy, typically filled with younger people. Older crowds sometimes enjoy the more ancient hanami, ume, or plum blossom viewing.

Although these gatherings have been canceled this year in Japan, traveling there to view the sakura and witness the festivals is worth the trip. If Japan is a little too far many places in the United States also celebrate cherry blossom festivals such as Washington D.C.’s National Cherry Blossom Festival and Brooklyn New York’s Matsuri Cherry Blossom Festival at the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens.