JODY VICTOR®

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Tips for Sleeping on Planes


Posted By on Sep 18, 2019

Whether it is for business or pleasure, when we fly, we want to feel rested and ready when the flight is over. On longer flights getting some rest might figure into feeling good when one lands. While there are many distractions on a flight that might keep some up, others just don’t sleep well while flying, quiet plane or no.

Over the counter medications or alcohol may help some people relax and sleep, however these will usually leave one groggy after waking.

Fliers should do their best to be comfy. Wear loose fitting and, if you need them, warm clothes. Try to use the restroom before falling asleep. Undo your belt and other restrictive accessories. Let your neighbors know you want to try and sleep through the flight.

It is best to bring one’s own comfort items like pillows and blankets as these are becoming more and more rare on flights. Noise canceling headphones, music, white noise, noise generators or some television episodes downloaded from your favorite streaming app help some people sleep.

The cues of your nighttime routine can help your brain prepare for sleep. Try sticking to any of them you can during the flight. Make your routines portable, not only for the plane, but your destination as well. Likewise, following your rituals will prepare your brain for sleep in an unfamiliar place and time zone.

The most important thing to remember is that if you can’t sleep, it is best not to stress out about it. Relax as much as you can. Even just lying back, shutting your eyes and letting your mind wander can be restful.

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In Montana one hotel patron cause a panic other travelers and hotel staff.

An open window at the T-4 Lodge and Restaurant in Big Sky looked like a perfect opportunity to explore the unknown for a young black bear who entered the hotel. Once inside the room the bear was stuck and quickly made himself at home.

Quite a few human patrons of the T-4 Lodge have posted photos of the ursine intruder. The T-4 Lodge brought in police and animal handlers from Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Even these animal experts had a hard time convincing the furry youngster to leave the comfy confines of the hotel.

Eventually the animal handlers decided to tranquilize the stubborn bear who was then removed safely and returned to the wild.

While the hotel wishes the bear well, they noted it did cause several hundred dollars in damages during its stay.

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Venice is going to begin routing cruise ships away from the historic center of the city. Residents of the city worry about the longevity of many of the cities aging structures and the local environment.

Officials want to reroute about 66% of ships by 2020. Both residence and officials are worried particularly worried about the biggest ships.

There are concerns over the simple fact that these ships bring an unreasonable amount of people into the city during tourist season which raises some safety concerns. Additionally, the wake created by the ships are eroding some shoreline structures of the sinking city, eroding the foundations of the buildings which are hundreds of years old. Not only that, but a cruise ship crashed into a dock this June.

This isn’t the only step Venice has taken recently to curb over tourism. It recently instituted an $11 day-trip fee for all tourists not staying over night.

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Believe it or not the average passenger averages 3.15 pounds of waste before leaving an aircraft. The International Air Transport Association estimated 6.7 million tons of waste was created on aircraft last year.

Another study reported that 23% of trash is food and beverage that could safely be consumed. Everything from food packaging and cultry waste, mini travel sized item packaging, aireline pillows, disposable headphones, everything imaginable.

Furthermore, many countries safety and health regulations insist much of the waste that is recyclable be incinerated.

Qantas, Australian airline, finished its first no-waste flight in May. All the waste on the flight was recyclable, compostable, or reusable. About one thousand plastic items were traded out for greener ones such meal packaging made from sugar cane and cereal starch forks, knives and spoons. All of this was later collected by the crew including recyclable items passengers brought on board themselves.

The result? A decrease of 75 pounds in waste according to a normal flight. KLM, Dutch airline, has announced it wants to follow suit with the use of more biodegradable materials. And Air France by the end 2019 has promised to reduce their usage of plastic by 210 million pieces.

 

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Outside of California’s capital Sacramento there is an incredible field of white and yellow flowers, daffodils, called McLaughlin’s Daffodil Hill. This popular tourist photo opportunity will be closing indefinitely. Why? Because of its extreme popularity created by buzz on social media.

The original plot of land was purchased in 1887 and has been passed down through the Ryan family since then. The Ryans, who still manage the property, posted the closure on social media on July 15th.

The post informs us that the “crush of visitors” was too much for the facilities currently available such as on-site parking and the local roads. The Ryans have safety and liability concerns continuing under current, rural infrastructure which couldn’t handle all the people wanting to photograph themselves among the daffodils for their social media accounts.

Daffodil Hill is among a growing group of tourist locations all over the globe having to close because of increasing social media, specifically Instagram, popularity and infrastructure or preservation concerns. Daffodil Hill isn’t even the only location under such duress in California.

Antelope Valley’s super bloom of poppies was so popular in 2019 visitors were doing crazy things like landing a helicopter into the field to access the area for their photo opp.

Maya Bay, in 2018, had to close because of over-popularity. This Thai island was made famous by the film “The Beach”.

Uluru or Ayers Rock in Australia will be closed off this October to climbers according to officials.

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